Videocast


Medical group mergers are a lot like marriages. Some are actual mergers. The formerly separate groups really do become one. For richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health.

What Does Partnership Really Mean?

Big data. Gotta have it. Gotta manipulate it. Let’s measure everything. Whatever we can measure improves!
Ride along with Mark as he discusses a twist on Lord Acton’s famous comment. The lack of actual power corrupts as well. There are ways to beat the “powerless” people, but it is not by playing their game.
Compliance – it’s the multi-zillion dollar reason why your medical group’s or healthcare business venture’s efforts must constantly be tested, reviewed, and retuned.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses the role of policies in your business and why they must mesh with your medical group’s other governance document. Ignore at your peril!
Earlier this year, a Santa Clara County, California jury awarded the insurer Aetna a $37,452,199.00 judgment in a lawsuit against Bay Area Surgical Management, LLC, a surgery center management company, a number of its managed ASCs, and three of Bay Area’s executives.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses rightsizing your medical group. Do you have the governance structure, policies, employment agreements, and other elements required to shift resources and reduce staff as well as expand it in face of shifting needs?
Hospitals are on the decline, are you focusing your future to compete in a changing world?
It seems as if nearly everyone working in healthcare has some sort of accreditation or certification. It’s the case for individuals and for facilities. Ride along with Mark as he questions who’s accrediting the accreditors, even the biggest one of all, the Joint Commission.
The long term success of your group relies on a governance structure that enhances the strength of the entire group rather than rewarding a few individuals.
Is the beginning, the middle or the closing of negotiations the most important timeframe in your deal making process?
Why you should always ask “why” when negotiating.
The healthcare labor market shifts with time but there will always be a place for entrepreneurial physicians and other healthcare providers who seek to develop and expand their independent ventures.  This is a rebroadcast of a very relevant concept.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses why physicians and other professionals aren’t commodities.
The healthcare labor market shifts with time but there will always be a place for entrepreneurial physicians and other healthcare providers who seek to develop and expand their independent ventures.
You’re driving toward contract success. But then the other party forces you off the road. Welcome to the exit marked early termination.
Two men failed to turn over more than $6 million in taxes collected from employees of an Arkansas, hospital, were convicted for the same crime they committed (and were serving time for) in Texas.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses why medical groups, like members of a species, must differentiate or die.
Hospital closures are impacting the physician employment market. Doctors are left with a choice of navigating the pitfalls of their own private practice or being part of the hospital which may lead to lower market value.
Take a seat and listen in as Mark discusses how the message sent within a medical group is like the lane lines on the road. Every once in a while, it needs to be resprayed.
Your contract may be open to ideas of interpretation. 
Ride along with Mark as he talks about a “backwards” thinking method that helps you get your business forward, fast.
Oftentimes the value of something relates to the environment in which it is presented.
Join Mark as he ponders the impact on your practice of antitrust enforcement against growing hospitals and chains.

GM drove its business into the ground by focusing on everything except building cars geared towards their customer base’s wants.

In the healthcare industry, there is a similar argument and comparison to be made. Will there be a physician payout anytime soon?

Ride along with Mark and learn about how you can apply the 80-20 rule, also known as the Pareto principle, in your medical group, practice, or business.
In my practice, I see a tremendous amount of tension, especially when it comes to the relationship between hospital administration and hospital based groups. Are you harnessing your power to influence those relationships and transform your practice?
You’ve undoubtedly head the expression, “it is what it is.” But in contracting, sometimes the contract isn’t what it is. Ride along with Mark as he discusses why you can’t let the contract fool you.
Oh what a tangled web they weave; multiple professionals caught up marketing an ineffective medicine in return for disguised kickbacks. If it sounds too easy and quick, think twice, don’t endorse unknown medicine to real people suffering with real pain.

Ride along with Mark F. Weiss as he talks about what firefighters’ actions tell us about the mindset required of medical group leaders.


I recently read an article about hospitals training physicians for “leadership” roles. What those hospitals are really doing is training more physicians to become hospital-employed or hospital-controlled managers.
Mark F. Weiss shares how the same concept as home team advantage can be used by you in connection with contract negotiation. Controlling the process is just as important as controlling the field or court.
I’m writing this on the Friday after Thanksgiving, the day that merchants have trained shoppers to expect the lowest prices of the year.
Ride along with Mark F. Weiss as he discusses the issue of how to amend a contract. In particular, he talks about the mistake of setting too high a barrier to amendment of a multi-party agreement, such as a medical group formation document.
Some leaders of hospital-based groups, and I use the term “leader” broadly, believe that their groups are a function of the hospital. If the hospital no longer wants to contract with them, then that would be it, they’d simply pull the plug on the group.
Mark Weiss let’s you know the factors to consider in negotiating for, or against, an attorneys fees provision in a contract. Is “winner gets fees” always a smart strategy?
If you’re selling medical services but collecting only peanuts (or even hot dogs) let me know. You need a better agent.
Mark Weiss let’s you know how to think about arbitration provisions in your contract. Why would you want one? How can they be used?

When The First Class Physicians Leave The Hospital, Who’ll Be Left? 

There’s a growing trend of dissatisfaction on the part of office practice physicians employed by, or otherwise closely aligned with, hospitals. What will happen when the good physicians leave?

The Lesson of Indoor Farming Applied to ASC/Facility Development 

Ride along with Mark Weiss as he discusses how you as a physician can apply concepts from indoor farming to your development of ASCs and other independent healthcare facilities.
Through the filter of his mind, Christopher Columbus reported seeing three “mermaids” — in reality manatees. Are you basing business decisions on the world as you believe it to exist?
Ride along with Mark as he discusses the tendency of many physicians and healthcare entrepreneurs to skip a critical review of the legality of their business structures.
Mark discusses why if your mindset is that spending money on your future is a cost, you don't have a future.
Mark shares some secrets about negotiations with managed care payors. Payor contracting is about much more than dollars per unit.
Learn why, just like a squirrel that escapes being eaten by a dog today, your medical group’s odds of long term survival might not be so great.
Ride along with Mark as he tells how an opossum fooled his dog Larry, and its immediately actionable lesson about negotiation.
Learn why you need to use a “red team” to really know what’s going on inside your business.

Take a seat while Mark discusses that merging weak hospitals and other healthcare combinations are the equivalent of merging Sears and Kmart.


Tom Peters popularized the style of business management in which the manager cruises the workplace observing and interacting. He referred to it as “management by wandering around.”
Ride along with Mark as he discusses the new concept of the physician-owned Massive Outpatient Clinic™, the MOC™.
It was 9:00 p.m. The restaurant was clearing out. I was eating alone after returning to the hotel following a meeting. Then I overheard the guy across the room tell his dinner companion all about the healthcare kickbacks that he'd received.
Join Mark and consider whether a business hack is shortcut or just a cut that makes your business bleed.
Would you write a check to a charity that pays its top executive $3 million a year? Does that charity really need your money?
Ride along with Mark as he fills you in on why preparation and practice makes or breaks negotiation performance.
He was laid off. How long would it take to find a job?
Yesterday morning, I took my car to the dealer for service. I left several messages in the afternoon to see if the car was ready. No one returned my call.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses magic work and why you need to do it and charge for it.
I watched as the cat watched the squirrel climb the tree. Intent on its goal, a moment of two later, the cat followed it up into the large oak.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses the importance of grooming your medical practice or healthcare business for sale, even if you don’t intend to sell.

I hate it when people lie to me.

I also hate it when people lie to my clients and friends.

Join Mark as he discusses, from the angle of a completed M&A deal, why it’s vital that you always have a bigger future. Living or operating from the past is no way to live; it’s a way to die.
The expression lead, follow, or get out of the way has more than a kernel of truth to it.
Forget Einstein and learn Mark’s Theory of Relativity: No deal that a medical group or facility, or even an individual, does is actually an isolated transaction. Join Mark as he reminds you that it’s all related.
From down the street I could see the fortune teller’s shop.
Ride along with Mark and learn what lesson quantum computing has for medical group management.
Value is what’s important to your customer. Not to you.
Coups and business cloning often decimate medical groups.
Sit back while Mark talks with you about the opportunity to profit from how healthcare decentralization is mirroring the overall economy.
Don’t get your medical group or healthcare business lost in big data.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses why it’s essential that you learn as much as possible about the people on the other side of a negotiation.
It’s not just the delivery of medical care that determines the value that your medical practice or group delivers. It’s all of the “soft” stuff as well — in fact, the so-called soft stuff is a larger factor than groups generally acknowledge. Very few groups reward their physicians for it.
The scalpel of surgeon Farid Fata, M.D. continues to cut from beyond the metaphorical grave, i.e., from behind the walls, gates, and concertina wire of the United States Penitentiary in Atlanta, Georgia.
Hitch a ride with Mark and learn about the federal government’s growing push to penalize noncompliance with healthcare regulations including their attempt to federalize alleged violations of purely state law.
If the future of surgery is medicine, then the future of medicines is compounding, the individualization of dosages and drug combinations.

How would your reorganize your medical practice, healthcare business, and relationships if you were paid only for successful outcomes, no matter how they are measured? Take a ride with Mark as he discusses using the thinking tool of “contingency” payment to improve your business. Idea category: Manage your practice.


Hospital based medical groups are often faced with a choice upon exclusive contract renewal: The expectation or demand on the part of the hospital that the group must provide its services, perhaps even at a higher level of intensity, for lower or no stipend support.
Ride along with Mark Weiss as he gives you the tools to ask whether you’re holding yourself back from greater success.

A diamond and a rock, sitting side by side. Both discovered near the bottom of the Udachny diamond mine in the Sakha Republic region of Russia, one of the world’s ten deepest open-pit diamond mines.

But are they of the same value?

Ride along as Mark Weiss asks what price you’re willing to pay for success, however you measure it.
Efficiency. Hospital administrators and other bureaucrats say that they want it. Medical group leaders parrot it.
Listen in as Mark Weiss discusses how the end of Obamacare will create a huge recruiting opportunity for medical groups.
“No plan survives contact with the enemy,” is a famous concept credited to many, bastardized by dozens, and plagiarized by even more. That’s because it’s true.

Join Mark Weiss for a quick chat about the enforceability of covenants not to compete in the context of facility investment.

Legend has it that it was a bottomless basket. As much tribute to the master as could be piled into it, the basket took more and more and more.
Ride along as Mark Weiss and his special guest, Frederic Bastiat (well, just his philosophy), and learn about how to incorporate Bastiat’s principles of “that which is seen and that which is not seen” into medical group decision making.

It was a Sunday. I was buying ties.

“Phone number, please?”

Those were the first words spoken by the saleswoman. A question.

Join Mark as he waxes philosophical about the death of colleges and the future of medical education.
To paraphrase J.P. Morgan, we always have two reasons for doing anything: a good reason and the real reason.

Ride along with Mark, but don’t touch the wheel, as he discusses who should be driving your medical group’s future.

At a time when telemedicine and telehealth are poised for rapid expansion, many state medical boards are doubling down on what appears to be their true purpose: enacting and enforcing anti-competitive measures to protect those already licensed in the jurisdiction.

Whether you’re paid a salary, by the hour or by the unit, you’re actually paid on commission.
Many medical groups (actually, many of all sorts of businesses) shortchange their future as a result of their past.

Do yourself a favor and ride along with Mark as he talks about a secret to hiring physicians and other medical group employees.


Are physicians going each day to a factory . . . a factory of a different kind?

Mark and Larry tell you why work-life balance is a myth.


When I was a kid, I built models, usually of airplanes and of cars.
Some hospitals and medical groups build whistleblowers.

Hillary Clinton has promised to support Obamacare with a goal of moving to “universal coverage” or single payor. Think about hardening your business to prepare for that eventuality.


Medical groups, especially first generation medical groups, often suffer from a common management error: Their leaders or board members manage from the perspective of their individual personal success, not from the perspective of the group’s, that is, the business’, success and of its long-term future.

Mark explains the starting point for evaluating ASC development and offers you a way to obtain an initial analysis. 

The common belief, and it may be quite true, is that change is the greatest cause of stress. But what if it can be used to your group’s advantage?

Many medical groups, especially those run as a club or collection of colleagues, fear spending any money because they view spending as a cost.


My friend Steve had a paper route, delivering the LA Times on his bike early in the morning.

Jim Collins wrote about putting the right people on the bus. Ride along with Mark as he talks about who’s driving it.


I was driving when I saw the sign, one of those large plasticized canvas ones, tacked up on the side of a small office building:

“FREE* First Chiropractic Visit”

Take a drive with Mark as he helps you avoid the accident called a “disruptive physician.”

Want a great stock tip ?

No, I’m not offering one. Instead, this is a question that I hear from time to time from physician group leaders.

Ride along with Mark as he explains that you’ll never move forward if you’re looking at the past.
Many physicians, even physician group leaders, have trouble with the notion of transformational change because today’s payor and hospital centric status quo is their “normal.”

Ride along with Mark as he navigates the issue of the true term of any contract.

In 1919, New York hotelier Raymond Orteig announced the Orteig Prize: $25,000 to the first aviation team to fly nonstop between New York and Paris.

Mark reveals an important secret for preventing your staff from blowing the whistle to the OIG or filing a False Claims Act lawsuit.


I just read an article on Modern Healthcare’s website about balance billing in the out-of-network context.
Take a seat as Mark discusses the concept of antifagility as applied to your medical group and then shares a tool to achieve it.

Remember attending that auction in which people overbid for that obvious-to-most mass produced ceramic vase?

The attractiveness of a deal multiplies by the number of “buyers.”

Ride along with Mark as he discusses the need to keep your business options open in a time of rapid change.

Growth. There’s lots of talk about it.
Take a seat as Mark discusses why cost-based thinking is holding you back.
Is your group being governed or governed? Yes, it’s a trick question. But the answer might just be a joke on you.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses why you have to treat covenants not to compete as stand alone deals, even when they are part of a larger agreement.

Some physician groups operate like vending machines.

Instead of Cokes or 7-Ups, efforts are placed into the machine and are dispensed to patients.

Ride along with Mark as he discusses why a successful merger or acquisition deal must be equal to more than the sum of its parts.
Back in the dark ages of medicine, I mean, in 2014, I wrote about competition from Dr. Nurses and Assistant Physicians. Now I’m writing about Dr. Robot. Same issue. Just on steroids.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses why playing for someone else’s team and by someone else’s rules will hold you back.
The initial notion of a hedge fund was that its investment risk was reduced through a “hedge,” an off-setting investment.
Listen in as Mark discusses why you must use a “red team” to find your business’ weaknesses and faults before a competitor does.
It was June when I saw it. The boarded-up stores of Main Street, paved red with bricks and lost hope.
Your parents and teachers probably taught you to play it safe. Listen to Mark tell you not to.

Sessile animals, for example, sponges or coral, live their lives fixed in one place. Food comes to them.

You might thing that they’ve got it made. But, in an emergency, as when their natural defenses fail them, almost none have the ability to move. It’s all over.

We think of private equity investors having an exit strategy. Ride along with Mark as he talks about why you need one, too.
Anita Roddick, the late founder of the highly successful natural cosmetics chain, The Body Shop, which she sold to the cosmetic giant L’Oréal for $1.1 billion, was a tremendously driven entrepreneur and an extreme social and political activist.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses how “fair market value” compensation will gut your future, and what to do about it.
Efforts treating patients don’t create value between a medical group and a facility.
Ride along as Mark talks about some issues pertaining to developing and operating a surgery center.

Imagine that your only menu choice, anywhere, is a Happy Meal. It doesn’t matter whether it’s at McDonald’s or at Chez Prétentieux. The Happy Meal is the only thing on the menu.

Ride along with Mark as he tells some important tales about merger deals gone wrong.
The tides come in and out, ties get wider then narrower then wider again, and society cycles round and round from “me” to “we.”
Mark discusses how a messed up ASC venture led to a $37 million judgment and what it means for out of network providers everywhere.
Thomas Edison didn’t invent the incandescent light bulb. But he perfected it. Edison is the one who seized the opportunity.

Ride along with Mark as he discusses hiring for the right mindset.

In many medical specialties, both hospital and office based, national groups have become significant competitors.
Mark discusses the fact that it’s one thing for a medical group or facility to trust its employees, but you also have to verify that they’re following procedures.
Mark discusses the fact that it’s one thing for a medical group or facility to trust its employees, but you also have to verify that they’re following procedures.
I’m no enemy of fast food. I just don’t want to eat it. I don’t care if you do.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses a recent Colorado investigation into Medicaid over-billing and the $3,000,000-plus repaid to the state. There are actionable takeaways for you and your group.
The cars are going at least 85 even though the posted speed limit is 65.
Ride along with Mark as he discusses the best way to deal with disruptive employees.
You, not your competitors, control your future - why would you think otherwise?
Ride along as Mark talks about conforming your practice to the expectations set by the Minute Clinic, the iPhone and other healthcare disruptors.
How may times have you heard someone say, or yourself said, that some event that would affect your group, your career, your future, is so remote that it’s impossible.

But, the seemingly “impossible” does happens. The unsinkable ship sinks. An industry dies. The exact same match-up of 16 soccer teams is drawn in rehearsal and then officially.
How may times have you heard someone say, or yourself said, that some event that would affect your group, your career, your future, is so remote that it’s impossible.

But, the seemingly “impossible” does happens. The unsinkable ship sinks. An industry dies. The exact same match-up of 16 soccer teams is drawn in rehearsal and then officially.
How may times have you heard someone say, or yourself said, that some event that would affect your group, your career, your future, is so remote that it’s impossible.

But, the seemingly “impossible” does happens. The unsinkable ship sinks. An industry dies. The exact same match-up of 16 soccer teams is drawn in rehearsal and then officially.
How may times have you heard someone say, or yourself said, that some event that would affect your group, your career, your future, is so remote that it's impossible. 


But, the seemingly “impossible” does happens. The unsinkable ship sinks. An industry dies. The exact same match-up of 16 soccer teams is drawn in rehearsal and then officially.
But, the seemingly "impossible" does happen. The unsinkable ship sinks. An industry dies. The exact same match-up of 16 soccer teams is drawn in rehearsal and then officially.


Hospitals are attempting to gain even more control over medical staffs. Watch to learn what you must know.

Hospitals are attempting to gain even more control over medical staffs. Watch to learn what you must know.

Hospitals are attempting to gain even more control over medical staffs. Watch to learn what you must know.
Hospitals are attempting to gain even more control over medical staffs. Watch to learn what you must know.
In 1919, New York hotelier Raymond Orteig announced the Orteig Prize: $25,000 to the first aviation team to fly nonstop between New York and Paris.

The federal Anti-Kickback Statute is a criminal statute. The fact that someone exactly like you hasn’t (yet) gone to jail for violating it shouldn’t provide any comfort.
The federal Anti-Kickback Statute is a criminal statute. The fact that someone exactly like you hasn't (yet) gone to jail for violating it shouldn't provide any comfort.

Office-based specialists, from ENT’s to urologists, often enter into suite sharing arrangements. No problem! That is, until they make it one.

Office-based specialists, from ENT’s to urologists, often enter into suite sharing arrangements. No problem! That is, until they make it one.
Office-based specialists, from ENT's to urologists, often enter into suite sharing arrangements. No problem! That is, until they make it one.

Medical group decision making often moves fast when it should be slow, and slow when it should be fast.
They looked for a 16 cent phone charge.

I know someone who runs an efficient business. Or so he tells me.
It's not enough to discover the other entity's motivation in the negotiation. What's their representative's personal motivation in concluding the deal?
I stood there with the other workers, a large rotating table separating us. As the parts moved by we each glued on another piece until Mary took them and put them in a box.
The gesture of sending a simple thank you note is often thought of as archaic, and that’s why it’s so important. Watch as Mark talks about the power of a thank you.

Please! The next time a hospital tells you that they’ve checked the deal with their lawyers and that it’s okay, don’t take their word for it. They won’t pay your fine and they won’t do your time.

Please! The next time a hospital tells you that they’ve checked the deal with their lawyers and that it’s okay, don’t take their word for it. They won’t pay your fine and they won’t do your time.
Please! The next time a hospital tells you that they've checked the deal with their lawyers and that it's okay, don't take their word for it. They won't pay your fine and they won't do your time.
As they say, the problem is that you don’t know what the problem is. And so it goes with risk within a medical group. Even though an element of risk might be small, it’s impact could be fatal on your group. Assess and manage risk to create profit and entity value.
Customers -- my clients generally refer to them as patients, but that doesn't make any difference -- expect service.
Hurry up. Then slow down.
Physician groups are targets–hedge by taking risks outside of your current base.
Consider the value of thinking several moves ahead.
Your group has held the exclusive contract for your specialty services, for example anesthesiology or radiology, for decades, but now the hospital is holding an RFP.
Covenants not to compete may be under attack, but there are alternatives.
In an organization we tend to be judged for what we do – not for the decisions that we make not to do something.
You can impact the eventual valuation of your medical group or other healthcare business venture years in advance through proper formation, organization and governance.
Socialism is alive and well, and I'm not simply talking about the socialistic charade of Hugo Chavez.
As more procedures move from the hospital to the ambulatory setting, physicians need to carefully consider the impact of covenants not to compete.
Years ago, I met someone who ran a food concession business at a large public venue, a county fair ground.
People complain that they’re “working like a dog.” Isn’t that a good thing? Watch as Mark and his dog, Larry, set you straight.
The limo driver said that he’d made some bad choices in life. Some things hadn’t worked out as planned.
Just like a living creature, every deal has a lifespan. If you get off the pace of a deal’s lifespan, you risk blowing the entire deal.
Marcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three “P’s” to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedures

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P’s.
Marcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three “P’s” to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedures

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P’s.
Marcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three “P’s” to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedures

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P’s.
Marcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three “P’s” to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedures

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P’s.
MarMarcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three “P’s” to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedures

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P’s.
Marcus Lemonis of the TV show, The Profit, says that there are three "P's" to business success:

1. People
2. Product
3. Procedure 

But in terms of medical group success, there are actually 4 P's.
Mark’s often asked if we should sell our medical group. No matter what the answer, the pre-planning strategy and actions bring value to you.
Preparation. It doesn’t matter whether you’re grooming your practice or business for sale or grooming it to hold and grow.
Many medical groups believe that the future is binary: continue on the same course or sell out. But the future is not binary, there are multiple potential futures to consider.
Words matter. They are the bullets in the fight for public perception, in the battle for change.
Try staying ahead of the curve rather than subscribing to the status quo of best practices.
Unlike slow lorises, glacial speed is not a medical group's friend. Your predators have an easier time spotting your weaknesses when you're standing still. Your leaders gain nothing by simply protecting the status quo.
Driver-less cars are getting in more accidents than those driven by people because these autonomous vehicles don't know when to take risk; when to swerve out of the way or accelerate to avoid an accident. Are you taking the necessary risks in your practice?
How easy, or hard, do you make it for potential deal partners to find you?
Did you think the goal of negotiation is to be liked? Try galvanizing respect.
Shh! We’re eavesdropping right now on a discussion between two healthcare executives who’ve just identified an issue that needs to be resolved.
Due diligence is more than the investigation after a deal is tentatively made. It’s also important to investigate, up front, the people and entities with whom you’re planning to deal.

As healthcare entities become larger they appear as formidable competitors in the marketplace.

So what’s an independent group to do?

I’m sure you’ve heard the saying ‘look before you leap’, but have you heard ‘document your deal with your partners before commencing business’?
“Psst! Send me some referrals. I can’t pay you directly, so I’ll pay your spouse.”
We’re all aware of the push for greater efficiency in healthcare. Unfortunately, doing the absolute wrong thing the right way is incredibly efficient.
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is
from, say, the hospital.
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is
from, say, the hospital.
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is
from, say, the hospital
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is
from, say, the hospital.
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is from, say, the hospital.
Many physician groups are fighting the last war, imagining that the threat to their existence is
from, say, the hospital.
What is your compensation plan actually incentivizing?
Have you ever been forced into something? Something you hated? Something you really did not want to do? Something that you’d almost give everything up not to have to do?
Your ability to handle uncertainty is linked to the likelihood of your success.
Driving through California’s Central Valley you see, and sometimes cross over, the aqueducts bringing water to the farmland.
People are too worried about what someone else thinks of them. News flash: They don’t think about you.
There is one weird trick and it can be yours and it has nothing to do with belly fat but everything to do with increasing your practice’s or business’s success: Clickbait.
Hamburgers sold by a dog food company? Are you sending the wrong signals, too?
Proponents of the ACO model argue that this time it’s different, that the model is not about controlling physicians, it’s about clinical issues and getting physicians integrated with other providers, both in respect of macro issues (e.g., establishing protocols, determining best practices and the design of studies) and micro issues (e.g., the coordination of a particular patient’s care).
Many medical group and other business leaders fear change. But if your business isn’t moving forward, it’s dying.
Years ago, one of my former partners had a case in which a stock broker built up a huge book of business, only to have his clients “reassigned” to a famous heavy-hitter at the firm that took over the brokerage.
Have you set yourself up by setting up your medical groups so that it doesn’t have cash reserves?
Both Washington and Lincoln were exceptional. Thrust into lives that they wanted but didn’t want, from pasts of trial and error, and failure upon failure. Self-promoters whose careers didn’t follow a smooth arithmetic progression.
When everyone’s included in group governance, no one owns leadership.
In a very real sense, all physicians give a limited warranty – it’s called malpractice liability.
A physician has been indicted for his role in a compound pharmacy prescription scam that included disguised kickbacks. Lots of lessons here.
You’re under competitive pressure, so why cut your own group off at its knees?
An outsider with no knowledge of any single fraudulent claim brings an False Claims Act suit. What you need to know.
Your compliance system has a leak.
Strategy and tactics don’t mean a thing unless you know your desired destination. Where are you going?
We all place a different value on what we receive and we’re willing to pay a comparable price. It has nothing to do with the cost to the producer or provider.
Are you holding yourself back? Chances are that the answer is “yes.” Stop stopping your success.
There’s a significant amount of timing involved in respect of the negotiation of agreements between physician groups and hospitals, especially in connection with exclusive contracts.
You say that your medical group is insured – is it really?
Like a dry cleaner, healthcare providers have to screw up to lose a customer’s loyalty.
Are you building your career or practice? You’ll never get ahead if all you’re doing is protecting your position.
Although airlines have a lot to learn about customer service, they do serve as a model for pricing strategy in healthcare.
His comment still sticks in my craw. The so-called expert said something like, “In the new economy, physicians need to lower their income expectations.”

Why?
Do you know what happens upon the termination of the contract? What obligations do you continue to owe?  And, what obligations continue to be owed to you?
In many medical specialties, both hospital and office based, national groups have become significant competitors.
In any negotiation, be the party to deliver the first draft and control the deal.
Hospital employment? Sure, it’s security… in some alternative universe.
HIPAA fines aren’t just given for breaches of HIPAA policy but for potential violations as well.
Do you know this key to negotiation? The key that will open the door to a done deal, a deal that delivers on your wants?
Charles Revson, the founder of Revlon Cosmetics, sold hope; his competitors just sold lipstick. Do you understand, really understand, what it is that you’re selling?
Many businesses of all kinds, from medical groups to, well, mortuaries, view their goal as not to go out of business. To protect their turf. To keep on keeping on.
I planned to buy, but as soon as I walked 13 feet into the car showroom, I knew that they’d make no sale. The three salesmen were huddled around a small TV set, watching football. None made eye contact. None said a word.
Is your medical group’s governance structure holding it back? A bloated board? A fully consensus style? Do you have a governor on you future?
The medical group that I was going to see was under pressure. One of its former members had jumped ship and aligned with a competitor. The hospital issued an RFP. The competitor became the golden haired group.
Patient satisfaction is beginning to impact physician compensation. Here’s a way to put your finger on the scale of patient satisfaction.
In the U.S., it seems that lots of people expect a tip, from the person who simply hands you your coffee at Starbucks to, I’d expect, hospital administrators (but only at for-profit facilities). Okay, just kidding, but you get the idea.
You’ve heard that old expression to the effect that it’s better to do and then ask for forgiveness than it is to ask for permission in the first place. I’m not sure if that’s always right in a social setting, but in business it often works out in your favor.
Value is what a buyer receives for the price paid. If value is more than the price, it’s a good deal. The devil though, is in the details: what’s value to you isn’t value to everyone. And, value is determined by the buyer.
Compounding pharmaceuticals, specific drugs for specific patients, offers tremendous benefit. The problems arise when the benefit is for the prescribing physician.

We used to get bomb threats all the time.


Far too often, medical groups – in fact, closely held businesses of all kinds – have bombs, of sorts, within them, too.

When we talk about joint ventures in healthcare, we tend to think of illegality.
What story are you telling about your practice?
When things begin to go awry between hospitals and contracted medical groups, these are the sort of complaints that hospitals levy.
Price is what you pay. Value is what you get. Learn how to leverage their relationship.
I see zombies every day. More physicians don’t question the promises of employment.

The big muddy. The Mississippi River flows thousands of miles before reaching the Gulf of Mexico. A huge river.

What about your practice? Is it a single channel, even a very large single channel, or is it supported by multiple streams, streams of income, that is?

Competitive advantages are developed, excluding competitors from the equation.
Are you a Chevy dealer or a doctor?
Are you actually preventing your medical group’s success?
Kodak chose to ignore the threat of digital photography. What threat is your medical group ignoring?
Take a painting and change the frame and the painting changes with it.
Be honest: Do you own your practice or does it own you?
A study found little correlation between nonprofit hospitals’ CEO pay, which averaged almost $600,000 per year, and performance.
"The physician subsidiary entity is a physician alignment model sold as a kinder, gentler, freer alternative to direct hospital employment."
A recent trip to a restaurant and the post office illustrate the difference between entrepreneurial medicine and the brave new bureaucratic world of healthcare.
"For the health of patients or for the financial health and convenience of its operators and staff?"
"Obamacare provides health insurance coverage, but coverage is not access to care. For care, you need physicians and you need to be able to see a physician, the right one, when you require care."
"Mark, it's not what you said, it's how you said it."
Coups and business cloning often decimate medical groups.
We'll begin boarding in a few minutes.

Although airlines have a lot to learn about customer service, they do serve as a model for pricing strategy in healthcare.
Steve Jobs famously believed public demand wasn't important in terms of identifying the market for new products. Instead, what Jobs envisioned the public would want wasn't even on the public's radar.
Your house is for sale.

A potential buyer comes along. You are happy. You let the buyer know that you'd love to sell to him. You don't look for other offers.
The reason why countries revolt simply to turn to another dictator, why the spouse of some politician is feted as savior, and why hospitals turn to national organizations to provide items and services as varied as toilet paper to neonatology, is the same: People — all of us, from Joe and Josie on the street to hospital administrators on the third floor — have an innate desire to be led.
They set out to develop a high grip glue. But it completely failed. They eventually made hundreds of millions.
Top level hospital-based groups cannot merely be concerned about maintaining a relationship; they must be concerned about delivering a transformational experience to their relationship partner.
Bob, not his real name, was talking about one of his early post college jobs...
An $800 sneaker?

How can its lessons be applied in your practice or business?
Bob, not his real name, was talking about one of his early post college jobs...
Have you heard the one about the man who doesn’t walk into a bar?
What motivates the party on the other side of the deal?
What's your time horizon?
Certainly, patient care within your medical specialty involves many complicated and complex issues
"How do you become a millionaire? Make a billion dollars and then buy an airline." -- Warren Buffett
"Sign this please. Right there. Yeah, there, on the last line. Next to the date."

Your group’s practice metrics indicate all is OK. But you’re about to crash.

How can its lessons be applied in your practice or business?
I recently read an article about a woman bemoaning the fact that she had been “cheated,” as her investment in General Motors bonds was about to become worthless. The system had failed her, she cried.
It’s not uncommon for some physicians to be engaged in multiple ventures. For example, an ophthalmologist may be a partner in a group with a practice location in City X as well as a shareholder in a group providing weekend ophthalmology coverage in Suburb Y.
Your medical group's most important assets, its physicians and other providers, walk out the door each night.
Some hospital attorneys and, therefore, some hospital administrators, believe that every contract for professional services should be subject to a request for proposal (RFP) process. That’s ridiculous.
A congressional study compared the performance of San Francisco International (SFO) Airport's privately contracted screeners with those of LAX's TSA staffed screeners. SFO's staff screened 65% more passengers per screener than the government employed TSA personnel at LAX.
"Bob, we've got to give you your two weeks notice. Here's a check for the next two weeks' compensation. Just pack your personal belongings and Jerry, here, will see you to the door."
Grace, not her real name, was very pretty. Long blonde hair. Tall. Fun.
The physicist Niels Bohr is reputed to have quipped that prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.
People often cite Newton's First Law as something akin to "an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction."
As a recent Wall Street Journal article recounts, Japanese manufacturers, once the world’s leaders in electronic goods and especially in cell phone technology, lost big in the switch to smartphones.
Physician compensation surveys assume that you're average. It's up to you to break out of the paradigm.
The harder you work, the more you make.

The smarter you work, the more you make.
When I was 14, my friend Steve and I were stopped by the police for breaking into a car.
What parent hasn't heard those words?
You've seen it before. Some customer in a store is bitching and moaning about something. I'm not saying that he might not have a point. But the way he goes on and on and on, the way that he's rude to the store staff, it's just too much.
Models. No, not the skinny kind in a magazine. But conceptual frameworks. Like global warming “models” or even Obamacare.
I’ve been thinking today about Pareto-type distribution, you know the “80/20 rule,” and physician employment.
Thirty some years ago, my father told me that you paid less for $150 shoes than you did for a $49 pair.
Great food isn't enough to keep a customer. Neither is great medical care.
I'm not really one for documentaries, but I recently watched, for the second time, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.
Bigger or larger or more providers or more locations do not, in and of themselves, make a stronger business.
Hospitals and the government have decided that physicians must collaborate financially in order to deliver quality healthcare. Of course, that's a lie.
"I want to become a partner."

Lawyers hear this all the time from newer members of their firm. Doctors, too, hear it from junior members of their medical group.
Covenants not to compete. Cultivating new business opportunities.
"We're screwed. The hospital won't renew our contract."
"We've got to stop ordering roller ball pens. Just order those cheap Bics."
You have been coming into work every day for years. Now there's no need to come in tomorrow because your group no longer exists.
The physician subsidiary entity is a physician alignment model sold as a kinder, gentler, freer alternative to direct hospital employment.
False positives. A significant problem in medicine.
“This is a golden opportunity to choose patients over profit” said U.S. Representative Jackie Speier as she announced the “Promoting Integrity In Medicare Act of 2013,” HR 2914.
I've often recommended that groups provide an Experience Monopoly™ to their customers: an experience for patients, referral sources and facilities that they cannot get from anyone else.
As the business of healthcare becomes more complex, many physicians are seeking certainty. It's not there.
Are you creating physical touch points for your patients, customers, referral sources and other potential deal partners?
Ignore the societal rules that exist simply to hold you back.
How easy, or hard, do you make it for potential deal partners to find you?
Where fairness is judged by outcome, not opportunity, it soon takes on a surreal twist.
These are two entirely different goals and if a definitive answer doesn't immediately pop out of your mouth you're in trouble
Why you should always ask "why" when negotiating.
"I deserve it" is a meme infecting society . . . it affects medical group thinking, too.
It's often how the mistake maker, not the "victim," reacts that makes the difference in the outcome.
If your group can't develop a strategy because of internal dissension, then you're allowing someone else to choose a future for you.
For physicians, protecting your turf requires a balanced approach.
You're the leader of a medical group. One of your group's employees, Dr. Bob, wants to borrow $10,000...
All medical groups have a culture, whether or not it's been purposefully created. It exists.
What good is an exclusive contract if the facility demands that it become non-exclusive?
Not enough physicians? State plans to expand role of paraprofessionals.
Is that carve out from your exclusive contract really a kickback to referring physicians?
But your group needs to portray a unified image.
How medical groups can use surveys as tools in negotiations with hospitals.
Many "experts" tell physicians that the key to financial security is employment by hospitals. Do they really think you're that blind?
Survey reveals sixty-seven percent of physician who participated in an ACO in 2012 realized no personal financial benefit.
Attack a company model arrangement as soon as the threat surfaces.
Just because you don't see risk to your future on the horizon doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
Sorry. None of your patients, referral sources, or the hospitals at which you practice cares about your success.
Train your medical group's members for actions consistent with the group's strategy.
Measurement of "care" will soon count for more than care itself.
Is your medical group's compensation plan rewarding the right thing?
Physicians focus on the correct answer. But succeeding as a business leader requires acceptance of failure.
All provisions in a contract are intended to be enforced.
The perception of the truth plays an important role in group and individual physician success.
The indiscriminate use of technology is akin to the adoption and enforcement of rules.
What do you know, really know, about the people you do business with?
Don't focus too intently on patient care and forget the rest.
The future for medical groups might not be big or small.
Having all group members buy in to the same cause is a winning strategy.
If yours is an average group, you're doing more work for less pay.
Conversations help frame the shape of entire industries.
There are few legitimate reasons for groups to have leadership meetings.
Many medical groups operate as partnerships, generally partnerships of professional corporations.
Are you a Chevy dealer or a doctor?
What exactly is your group's competitive advantage?
In economic and ecological terms, the "tragedy of the commons" describes a situation in which those participating in a shared or common benefit abuse the privilege
Knowing how to develop emotion-based strategies and how to implement them are simply among the "combined arms" tools that medical groups must develop in order to thrive.
ACO's. Competition by hospital employed physicians. Commoditization.
Just because something is difficult to measure or evaluate doesn't mean that it shouldn't be taken into consideration in connection with your group's compensation plan.
If you're like most people, you hate shopping for a car. But even if you hate it, you probably follow the rule of negotiating with multiple dealers.
Does your medical group have a strategy to succeed, or are you simply hoping not to fail?
"From a dog's point of view his master is an elongated and abnormally cunning dog." - Mabel L. Robinson
In the relationship between a physician group and a hospital, problems happen. Planned or unplanned.
National groups often over-promise and under-deliver. Take advantage of it.
"When you have time to gripe, you have time to wipe." "When you have time to lean, you have time to clean."
When I read the practice management presentation topics of many organized medical societies, I'm stunned by the degree of victimhood and of loss of choice assumed.
Just as in sports, many medical group leaders are motivated by "winning isn't everything -- it's the only thing" thinking.
You protect your patients every day. You need to spend some time protecting the integrity of your group, as well.
Over the course of the past decade or so, carriers have ratcheted down payment and have begun a concerted shift away from compensating independent professionals to employing them directly at greatly reduced levels.
There's little question that most, if not all, medical groups should be led by practicing physicians.
Many physician group leaders look at events and circumstances impacting their practice as something that is happening to their group.
Time travel.

A joke? Or can you do the equivalent right now?
What does your ideal future look like?

Feel silly thinking about this? It's normal.
Is there a disconnect between the physician and the hospital?
Hospitals are employing more physicians. So why don't they want them to become really successful?
If you are a hospital-based physician, you can be certain that there are one or more so-called national groups targeting your facility. That is, they want to put you out of business.
The marketplace for hospital based services is becoming increasingly commoditized.
The healthcare tide is strong: pushing forward hospital-centric healthcare, accountable care organizations, and governmental meddling.
Like it or not, the practice of medicine is also a business.
Technological revolution enables the coordination of care across locations, providers, and facilities.
What story are you telling about your practice?
Does your group have a current strategic plan? Has it ever had one?
The hospital approaches you and says that they are building an ACO -- won't you join with them and become an employee of their sponsored foundation or medical group?
Are limiting beliefs holding you or your group back in your career and business success?
If collaboration really is the real thing, let the hospital design the deal, but the physicians control it.
Running a hospital based group as a "service" for the hospital, functioning as a sort of clearing house for income and expense, severely limits your group's future.
Do you know the secrets of using fear of loss as a tactic in hospital negotiations?
For the most part, physicians are stuck in a Marxian world of reimbursement.
The is no real security in depending upon a pseudo-parent employer.
Stacking the satisfaction odds in your favor.
Hospital administrators are involved in ACO formation, but physicians are being asked to fully commit.
Your contract's real term is how quickly it can be terminated.
We're not talking Teddy Roosevelt, we're talking intimidation.
Paying your "fair share".
Robert Collier, one of the fathers of direct mail advertising, famously advised copywriters to enter the conversation already going on within the customer's mind.
Money. Power. Status. Popularity. The four human interest motivators.
As much actual tension as there is between physician groups and ACOs, they share a common weakness.
The sky is falling--I know, I heard it on the news today.
Are physicians going each day to a factory . . . a factory of a different kind?
Are physicians going each day to a factory . . . a factory of a different kind?
Set aside time each week to strategize your long time goal.
The same relationship of predator and prey plays out daily between your hospital based group, hospital administration and physicians with adverse interests.
What is your back up plan in the event that your preventive action fails?
There's nothing glorious in financial failure.
What's a medical group worth? A question that sooner or later will be asked.
We change vendors like we change underwear.
Any communication with an administrator is part of the negotiation process.
Physician groups can profit from their compliance efforts.
Too many physician groups have no strategic plan.
There are many reasons why contracts are usually contracted.
Letting each partner write his or her terms of partnership is not a long term strategy for success.
Medical groups have two problems: They move too slow and do what everyone else does.
Let others bemoan the bad economy. Use your time to take advantage of the opportunities.
I'm fascinated by the role that luck plays in success.
Take the time to work on your business, not just in it.
Too often medical group leaders think they have to pay physicians the same amount.
Every touchpoint with a patient is an opportunity to build the relationship.
Will there be a physician bailout anytime soon?
A vaccine for office based physicians thinking of entering into an office sharing deal or a practice merger deal, with one or more other physicians.
The three most important things to do for your medical group to thrive in this economy.
Mark discusses the risks that hospitals often ignore in terminating the contract of a local hospital-based group.


Mark discusses the three major "tight integration" models for hospital acquisitions of physician groups.
Mark uses an analogy to show why even the best group can be destroyed by a relatively small mistake.

Is that carve out from your exclusive contract really a kickback to referring physicians?
Can the traditional hospital-based group service model survive?
There is no question that the healthcare market is changing rapidly. This means that groups must have the ability to make business decisions rapidly.
Many medical practices operate as if no one is driving the bus.
Yin and Yang. Contract Term And Termination: Your contract's real term is how quickly it can be terminated.
Medical groups face a tough choice in an ACO-centric world: Escape from commodity status or give up a significant portion of your gross to the ACO.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 39 - Resolving Healthcare Market Pressure


For many physicians, the winds of change are of hurricane force. Consider how they can be harnessed.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 38 - The Promise-Delivery Gap


National groups often over-promise and under-delivery. Take advantage of it.
Wisdom. Applied. No. 37 - Being The Best Group . . . In A Bad Location

Being the best isn't enough to save a hospital-based group at a dying hospital. Groups that want to survive must have a greater strategic outlook.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 36 - Did You Miss This Common Hospital-Group Contracting Issue

Medical groups often put their entire hospital contract negotiating focus on the obligations to and from the group, and in doing so, they miss an essential issue.
Wisdom. Applied. No. 35 - Avoid The Most Common Mistake Concerning Competition

Medical group leaders focus outward when protecting their group against competition. But often, the enemy is lurking within.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 34 - Medical Staffs Gone Wild


With more medical staffs dancing on the strings of hospital administration, physicians must become more aware of the medical staff's real role and its limitations.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 33 - The Myth of Physician Alignment

Mark demonstrates that even hospitals don't believe that physician alignment is anything other than a tool to control physicians.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 32 - Not All Business is Business Worth Having


Mark explains that for your medical group in this quickly changing market for healthcare services, not all business is business worth having.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 31 - Medical practice IS becoming more commoditized: Do you comply or do you thrive?


Mark discusses the fact that just because medical practice is becoming more commoditized doesn't mean you have to be a commodity.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 30 - Surviving The Changing Market For Hospital-Based Services


Mark discusses the changing market for hospital-based physician services and the steps local groups must take to survive.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 29 - Profiting From Hospital Compliance


Mark talks about how medical groups can profit from the increased compliance pressure being placed on hospitals.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 28 - The Fair Market Valuation Death Spiral


Watch as Mark discusses the death spiral of physician compensation resulting from the process of conducting fair market valuation studies.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 27- RFP in “Reverse”


Mark introduces the notion of an RFP for administrative services -- a Situation Transformer strategy designed to clamp down on hospitals' use of weaponized RFPs.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 26 - RFP Instead of Renewal


Mark discusses the trend of hospitals announcing RFPs instead of simply entering into contract renewal negotiations with their hospital-based groups.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 25 - Strategic Value



Mark discusses the concept of your medical group extracting strategic value from a deal, a financial return above and beyond fair market value.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 24 - New Years UnResolutions for 2011 - Pledge to stop behavior destructive to your practice's business.


New Years UnResolutions for 2011 - Pledge to stop behavior destructive to your practice's business.



Wisdom. Applied. No. 23 - The Hidden Purposes of ACOs -- How Physicians Can Take Advantage of the Structure


Watch as Mark goes into greater detail on the hidden purposes of ACOs and how physicians can take advantage of the ACO structure.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 22 - Physician Employment/Subcontract Agreements: The Pros and Cons of Promises of Specific Amounts of Work


Mark discusses an important provision in any production-based physician employment agreement or subcontract: The provision describing the amount of work or share of schedule the physician is entitled to, if any.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 21 - Hijack the Hospital's ACO Process


Mark discusses strategy for physician control of Accountable Care Organizations ("ACOs")

Wisdom. Applied. No. 20 - Thank You For The Diagnosis, We’ll Treat the Patient


Mark discusses the fact that your hospital administrator likely has plans to contain your practice to a consulting role, with hands on care delivered by a hospital-captive paraprofessional and employed physician team.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 19 - Institutionalized Happenstance


Watch as Mark discusses the implication of the calf path: What we believe to be well thought out structures impacting the business of medicine and the relationships within and between medical groups are often simply institutionalized happenstance.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 18 - Antimatter and Your Medical Group



Mark explains that most medical group failures are due to dissent within the group, as opposed to competition from outside parties.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 17 - Pack Behavior and Your Medical Group


Mark explains the parallels between pack behavior and the relationships within your medical group.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 16 - Volcanos and the Loss of an Exclusive Contract


Watch Mark as he discusses how medical groups must properly assess the risk of a practice changing event such as the loss of an exclusive contract -- and how to prepare for it.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 15 - Your Medical Group Isn't An ATM -- Why Confuse It With One?


Watch Mark as he reminds you that your medical group isn't an ATM -- so why treat it like one?

Wisdom. Applied. No. 14 - Cut Back Medical Group Growth For Growth's Sake


Watch as Mark discusses why a bigger medical group is not always better and why a strategic vision must precede growth.


Wisdom. Applied. No. 13 - Caught In The Storm Of Uncertainty?

Mark discusses what your group must do when it's caught in the storm of economic and healthcare "reform" uncertainty.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 12 - New Years UnResolutions.


Mark suggests some New Years UnResolutions -- things you resolve not to do in the coming year.

Wisdom. Applied. No 11 - Success Requires Both Strategy AND Implementation.

Mark F. Weiss discusses the fact that medical groups must both strategize and implement for their future.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 10 - Negotiating Strategy: You Can "Game" Game Theory's "Ultimatum Game."


Mark discusses why even great offers are sometimes rejected -- and what you can do to prevent it.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 9 - Don't Destroy Your Brand.


Watch as Mark tells how 22 cents cost a company millions of dollars of business -- and tells you how to avoid a similar fate.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 8 - Clowns, Artists and Context.


Watch as Mark F. Weiss lets us know what clowns and artists can teach us about context and why controlling context is required.
Wisdom. Applied. No. 7 - Six Golden Rules.

Mark discusses the 6 golden rules for crafting physician employment agreements and subcontracts

Wisdom. Applied. No. 6 - No Good Deed Goes Unpunished.


Mark discusses the problem of under-promising and over-delivering.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 5 - Does Your Medical Group Really Exist?


Mark discusses whether your medical group is really a group.


Wisdom. Applied. No. 4 - Career Success


Mark discusses Dr. Wouldacouldashoulda


Wisdom. Applied. No. 3 - Relations Between Medical Groups and Their Physicians


Mark discusses the relationship between medical groups and their physicians.

Wisdom. Applied. No. 2 - Obtaining Stipend Support

What Mark's dog can teach hospital-based physician groups about the timing and stratgegy of obtaining stipend support.

Wisdom. Applied. No 1 - Medical Group Customer Service


Mark F. Weiss of Advisory Law Group (www.advisorylawgroup.com) gives a short presentation on medical group customer service and relates that employment agreements and subcontracts can be used to incentivize appropriate levels of customer service.